March (again?) again – poems and nominations

Greetings from isolation! I can confess that I've been doing a terrible job keeping things up to date since the new year, but in fairness, I've haven't really had that much to say other than "Work in progress". But now I do have a few things to announce, so here I am. Firstly, I am … Continue reading March (again?) again – poems and nominations

Essays, Poems, and Novellas incoming!

Hello all, First of all, though I've had some things to share for a while, I've been holding off because it has seemed strange and inconsiderate to announce good personal news in the present moment. But I have enough now that it seems worth putting out here, in gratitude of the great people I've been … Continue reading Essays, Poems, and Novellas incoming!

Writing in times of crisis

Hello everyone, It’s sort of shocking to realize that my last post was barely a month ago. March was 80 years long. In case you missed it, you can read my poem A Bird of Flesh and Futures in Cypress Poetry Journal as their first piece. They are quickly building a wonderful little catalogue that … Continue reading Writing in times of crisis

Letters to a Young Poet in review

  The ten letters of Rainer Maria Rilke in correspondence with Franz Xavier Kappus that makeup Letters to a Young Poet offer little in the way of technical advice for writing. Rilke does not instruct on form; he does not comment on the use of language, or plot, or dialogue, or verse. However, what takes … Continue reading Letters to a Young Poet in review

Bowie Fiction

The Spectatorial

There was a time during the twentieth century when the position of the greatest science fiction author was officially split into three. The greatest authors were considered to be Robert A. Heinlein, Arthur C. Clark, and Isaac Asimov.

Of the three, the latter two came to an official accord on how to respond to questions of who was the better writer. While sharing a cab ride in New York, Asimov and Clarke drafted The Clarke-Asimov Treaty of Park Avenue.

This agreement stated that when asked who was best, Clarke was to refer to Asimov as the best science writer, and Asimov was to refer to Clarke as the best science fiction writer. Each was to claim to be second-best in the other’s field.

The only written evidence of this treaty appeared in the dedication of Clarke’s novel Report on Planet Three:

“In accordance with the terms of the Clarke-Asimov Treaty…

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