Come to the Nerd Nite!

Hello all! I’m excited to share that I’ve been announced as a speaker at Nerd Nite Toronto on November 28th. Here is a link to the event page, the 2019 Nerdtacular! I will be giving a talk about the Cyborg, a figure that has dominated the focus of my writing –both my academic and creative effortsContinue reading “Come to the Nerd Nite!”

Hey, remember the (Yellow) Nineties?

I’m excited to be joining Ryerson University’s Centre for Digital Humanities as a Research Assistant on the Yellow Nineties Project! This project, run by Professor Lorraine Janzen Kooistra, is creating a resource for scholars (and everyone else) to gain access to the early arts and literary magazines of the 1890s, first and foremost of whichContinue reading “Hey, remember the (Yellow) Nineties?”

Update: An Editor’s life

March! So it is now March. Thanks to all who sent such kind responses to the cover reveal of What We See in the Smoke. June 6th can’t come fast enough! I will have more book news soon enough, but today I’m pleased to announce that I am joining The Hart House Review as an associate editor!Continue reading “Update: An Editor’s life”

The Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy

Terese Mason Pierre will be presenting a paper on What We See in the Smoke at The Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy! the conference will be hosted at the fantastic Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation and Fantasy inside the Lillian H. Smith branch of the Toronto Public Library on Friday and Saturday, June 7-8,Continue reading “The Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy”

“Cat’s Cradle: The Sin of Scientists and Systems” by Ben Berman Ghan

Science Fiction (SF) is a genre often used to explore how scientists and science are a source of evil, potentially leading to the demise of civilization. Works such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus (1818) have well established the trope of the mad scientist who focuses on unnatural or evil experiments. Kurt Vonnegut Jr.’sContinue reading ““Cat’s Cradle: The Sin of Scientists and Systems” by Ben Berman Ghan”

Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and the death of Dialogue Tags

Cormac McCarthy’s 2006 novel The Road is an intensely bleak vision of the apocalypse. The narrative follows two characters only ever referred to as”Man” and “boy” as they limp across a grey and hellish landscape full of cannibals, rotting houses, and precious canned food in aquest to reach the ocean. McCarthy raises very uncomfortable questionsContinue reading “Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and the death of Dialogue Tags”

Arrival/Story of Your Life: Languages of film and Prose

[This isn’t the first time I’ve written on Arrival, and I doubt it will be the last. you can check out my original view of the film here at The Spectatorial:  Arrival – A Case of Déjà vu] Though Ted Chiang’s novella Story of Your Life was originally published in 1998, I did not discover it untilContinue reading “Arrival/Story of Your Life: Languages of film and Prose”

The Simplica Girl Diaries in review

“Limitations so frustrating” (Saunders 126) writes the narrator of George Saunders’ The Semplica Girl Diaries. But the self-imposed limitations and restrictions Saunders impose on his writing make for a more interesting story, building its narrative out of disturbing incompleteness. Set in an unspecified but near future, Saunders communicates everything about his narrative through the sparse,Continue reading “The Simplica Girl Diaries in review”

A Children’s Crusade in Reverse (Slaughterhouse Five in review)

[feeling a little unstuck? that might be because I’ve written on this novel before: God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut. In some circles, I’m known for talking about Vonnegut a lot, so you can also check out my review of one of the author’s weirdest works Slapstick, which Vonnegut himself graded a D, and my paper on Cat’sContinue reading “A Children’s Crusade in Reverse (Slaughterhouse Five in review)”

Ray Bradbury: There Will Come Soft Rains in Review

Few books have been as formative and influential for me as Ray Bradbury’s 1950 short story fix-up novel The Martian Chronicles. While the book as a whole is far from perfect – there are problematic depictions of gender and race throughout the middle section of the book – There will Come Soft Rains has alwaysContinue reading “Ray Bradbury: There Will Come Soft Rains in Review”