Vision in Review: I Too Shall Be Saved By Love

(Special note: The Vision, like many characters of Marvel Comics, was created by Stan Lee, alongside ‎Roy Thomas‎, and John Buscema. Stan Lee passed away this afternoon, which I learned literally while typing up this piece, and it is hard to think of a single other creator responsible for a legacy that has inspired and … Continue reading Vision in Review: I Too Shall Be Saved By Love

The Simplica Girl Diaries in review

“Limitations so frustrating” (Saunders 126) writes the narrator of George Saunders’ The Semplica Girl Diaries. But the self-imposed limitations and restrictions Saunders impose on his writing make for a more interesting story, building its narrative out of disturbing incompleteness. Set in an unspecified but near future, Saunders communicates everything about his narrative through the sparse, … Continue reading The Simplica Girl Diaries in review

Ray Bradbury: There Will Come Soft Rains in Review

Few books have been as formative and influential for me as Ray Bradbury’s 1950 short story fix-up novel The Martian Chronicles. While the book as a whole is far from perfect – there are problematic depictions of gender and race throughout the middle section of the book – There will Come Soft Rains has always … Continue reading Ray Bradbury: There Will Come Soft Rains in Review

Letters to a Young Poet in review

  The ten letters of Rainer Maria Rilke in correspondence with Franz Xavier Kappus that makeup Letters to a Young Poet offer little in the way of technical advice for writing. Rilke does not instruct on form; he does not comment on the use of language, or plot, or dialogue, or verse. However, what takes … Continue reading Letters to a Young Poet in review

Theory of Adaptation in Review

Note: Over the next two months I will be writing a series of very short reviews of both critical work and fiction for a special project. As there is nothing more I plan to do with these short reviews, I thought it might be appropriate to post them here over the coming weeks, if only … Continue reading Theory of Adaptation in Review

Ventures! Ventures! Everywhere! On Terse Journal and the Family Care office

Wow! Am I ever going to run out of announcements? I'm excited and honored to announce that I am joining Terse Journal as the new Prose Editor! Terse is a wonderful space, and I am proud to call it home. I am looking forward to reading and publishing new stories following Terse's new theme: Worlding Please … Continue reading Ventures! Ventures! Everywhere! On Terse Journal and the Family Care office

The Ink-Stained-Wretch

It's hard to say where the expression Ink-Stained-Wretch originates. Though I have found almost no reliable sources, at least one researcher told me in passing that the phrase comes from Canadian novelist Hugh Garner. Kurt Vonnegut’s novel Deadeye Dick attributes it to Alexander Woollcott, but this is probably wrong as well. To great alarm, I … Continue reading The Ink-Stained-Wretch

Writing in the Digital Age

The wastepaper basket is a writer’s best friend. - Isaac Bashevis Singer These words were true when the Nobel Prize winner Mr. Singer said them and they are true today, with a few key alterations. Not long ago, I was asked what it’s like to write in the 21st century, and I thought it’s about … Continue reading Writing in the Digital Age

Nanowrimo, or how I learned to stop word-counting and love the bomb

Hello writers and readers. As this is written, it is the end of November. While most people know November as that month where basically nothing happens, other than American Thanksgiving, some of you know it as Nanowrimo! (For those not in the know, that’s National Novel Writing Month) This is the month where all around … Continue reading Nanowrimo, or how I learned to stop word-counting and love the bomb